Notes on Chapter 5: Learning More about St Francis and Creation

Eager to loveChapter five, “Contemplation: A Different Way of Knowing

Quote from page 61-62

I believe the very foundation of what we mean by holiness or, in this case, mysticism, is that [Francis and Clare] knew and loved from a different source; they knew by participation in a Larger Knowing that many of us call God. Or, as Paul says, “They knew as fully as they were known” ( 1 Corinthians 13:12)

This kind of shared knowing, which is nothing but full consciousness is what many of us mean by contemplation. True contemplatives surrender some of their own ego boundaries and identity so that God can see through them, with them, and in them – with a larger pair of eyes. It is quite simply a higher level of seeing, and, if you do not like the religious language, you can just call it consciousness, or deep consciousness. But you still have to let go of your small, egoic self to get there (John 12:24). “Very truly, I tell you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains just a single grain; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.”

Conversation Question

  • What could you let go of and how could you let go in order for you to experience a closer union with God?

Continue reading “Notes on Chapter 5: Learning More about St Francis and Creation”

Adult Formation Journal: February 8, 2017

It is a proven fact that we grow in our faith when we do three things:

  1. read and study the Bible daily, whether it is one verse, one chapter, or more,
  2. pray daily, whether it is ten minutes of being still and quiet with God, one hour of contemplation, or praying throughout the day,
  3. apply faith principles to our daily lives, whether it is occasionally or often.

I have attached the two latest Daily Meditations from Richard Rohr:

His topic is contemplative prayer. Granted, it’s counterintuitive and not the way most people pray, but anyone can learn a method of contemplative prayer. It may be the most important step we can take to grow spiritually in this age. I welcome your comments and questions at Randolph@saintjameswarrenton.org.