Green Team Update: Response to Leaving the Paris Climate Agreement

For all of us, our country’s departure from the Paris Climate Agreement was deeply disturbing. Responses however, have included some very positive suggestions which focus on the fact that we, as Americans and Christians, believe that individuals are empowered to act. Please consider the following ways to respond:

— We pray because the Earth is God’s creation, and it is in His hands. The Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church made the following statement. A number of Episcopal Church bishops have also issued a joint statement.

— We work ever harder on our individual efforts to reduce our use of resources and our production of carbon dioxide.

— We join and support (both financially and with our time) those groups that work for sustainability. Virginia has joined the U. S. Climate Alliance; consider voicing your support for this action.

— We support the advancement of research in STEM in our universities -perhaps earmarking donations to our alma maters – and research facilities.

— We never forget those who lose homes and livelihood due to climate change.

— We never forget those who lose jobs from change in technology and who need support and education.

Your feedback is welcome: greenteam@saintjameswarrenton.org

Featured photo via United Nations Photo on Flickr.

Fr. Ben’s Response to the Anglican Primates’ Recent Actions

compass_rose_400While God may have called me to ordained ministry, I have long claimed that there are two core reasons why I am an Episcopal priest.

The first is centered around my experience as a navy brat. On average I moved every two years. I lived in the south, New England, the Pacific Northwest, and even overseas. Regardless where I lived, I belonged to ONE church, each new building or congregation an extension of the other.   The second reason is affirmed in the prayer for the newly baptized. We pray for an “inquiring and discerning heart”.   Our creedal beliefs and our identity as the body of Christ hold us together, but while we may have one head, Jesus Christ, we do not share one mind.

There is no ultimate earthly authority on the myriad of complex issues we face in the world today. We have tools, the three legged stool of scripture, tradition, and reason, our ecclesiastical governance, our common prayer, but we do not have universal consensus or a crib sheet of the church’s stance regarding x, y, and z (for which I am mightily grateful).

Even here at Saint James’ Episcopal Church, as the rector, I still speak only for myself. Our congregation holds as many worldviews, political, social, and theological views as we have members. I revel in the dynamism of our Thursday discussions with the bishop as we share, challenge, and learn from our different perspectives. I also believe when we gather communed by Christ’s grace and love and not by our like mindedness, we stand as a witness to our faith and an icon to the outside world.

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